Thu, 07 Oct | Barnsley

Tutorial: Using Rear Curtain Sync/Back Button Focus and Strobe Lights

Rear Curtain Sync is when the flash fires at the end of the exposure, or at the rear curtain. Meet at 7pm for a 7:15 start.
Tutorial: Using Rear Curtain Sync/Back Button Focus and Strobe Lights

Time & Location

07 Oct, 19:00 – 21:00
Barnsley, Back Ln, Barnsley S72 0JF, UK

About the Event

Rear Curtain Sync is a flash sync mode. The shutter opens and closes for a length of time determined by the shutter speed that has been set.  Rear Curtain Sync is when the flash fires at the end of the exposure, or at the rear curtain.  Picture a person walking in a dimly lit scene (so that long exposure can be used) from camera left to camera right. If they start walking at the left of the frame and the camera is fired in Rear Curtain Sync mode,  their motion trail will be behind them and they will be frozen somewhere mid-frame where they had walked to at the end of the exposure. 

In this Tutorial evening, we will go over some techniques to practise making your own images of this type. Setting the mode on your camera will depend on the make, so check your manual for your make/model. 

We will also cover using Back button focus, Back-button focus is a camera technique that separates focusing and shutter release into two separate buttons. It is a useful way to stop the camera’s autofocus system from getting continuously engaged when the shutter is released. In this meeting, we will take a closer look at what back-button focusing is, and how you can take advantage of it in your photography.

If time permits we will also look at using strobe lighting. When preparing for photoshoots, one of the most important decisions a  photographer can make is regarding lighting. Deciding between continuous lighting, strobe lighting, or speedlights can affect the look, tone, and quality of your image. Strobe lights emit a bright burst of light akin to on-camera flash photography. However, a strobe flash is brighter and produces a  tremendously short burst of light. Also known as monolights, strobes  have a quick recycle time and a full power output of anywhere from 100  to 1,000 watts. The higher the power output, the longer the distance  over which you can effectively use a studio strobe, although certain models have the ability to adjust their output in order to capture close-ups with less intensity. LED lights, halogen lights, and xenon flash lamps are all common light sources for strobe kits.